Creative Individualism

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Piaget considers children philosophers, when we learn as children, we apply your prior knowledge and learn through using our knowledge in the every day. He disputes how we teach our children in school and the emphasis that our education system puts on non cognitive learning. subjects like English, Maths and Science are all about learned knowledge and not applied learning; as very young children we go from the play friendly and interactive knowledge, to written and memorised text book learning very suddenly and we have to leave all the fun and engaging play behind. Looking at how children learn when they are still very curious learners, it’s debatable as to whether this is a healthy progression, we don’t learn in this oppressive way naturally and so the lack of cognitive involvement in the education system goes against the grain of our natural learning. More arts based subjects are less emphasised in mainstream education and aren’t appreciated for their methods and their cognitive learning styles.
Applying this to my own subject, it’s quite glaringly obvious to me, as to how it fits into my practice.
Illustration bridges the gap between both cognitive and noncognitive learning, even in the most unengaging science text books there have to be illustrations in way of explanation. Being able to even see a vague example of how something might work, appeals to the more cognitive learning of children. From my own experiences of the UK ‘stem’ system, I can say that the lack of cognitive involvement in my own education was frustrating, even on a basic level. Being part of the Arts, it has always been glaringly obvious how underplayed the arts education is. As a young student, I always doodled, still do really, but I was always penalised for it by my teachers; doodling has always been a form of information processing for me, and the fact that I was never allowed to do it in class was extremely frustrating and the habit was somewhat beaten out of me until I came to higher education in uni. My doodling in class was a form of illustration for me, a stream of consciousness on my page, of my thoughts while in my lessons; this helped me to digest my learning and to create things that I could then go back to for a form of revision.
Illustration bridges the gap between both cognitive and noncognitive learning, even in the most unengaging science text books there have to be illustrations in way of explanation. Being able to even see a vague example of how something might work, appeals to the more cognitive learning of children.

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